Growing the Root Partition on the Enterprise File Fabric

last updated on Jan. 20, 2021

Over time the way disk space is provisioned on Enterprise File Fabric VMs has changed. Growing the root partition depends on the starting version of the Enterprise File Fabric and not the current running release. This document will guide the user through finding the proper method of root partition growth.

It is important to backup or snapshot the Enterprise File Fabric before growing the root partition. Issues arising from improperly executing the instructions can result in an inoperable system which would only be recoverable by restoring the backup or reverting the snapshot.

Note: Starting with the 2006 build of the Enterprise File Fabric the root and database partitions are set up for automatic growth. To grow the root partition on File Fabric VMs that were originally created as v2006 or later, simply increase the size of the disk and reboot the appliance. To determine if the appliance has autogrow run the following as root:

if [ `grep growfs /etc/rc.local |wc -l` == 1 ]; then echo "Autogrow is enabled"; fi

If the message “Autogrow is enabled” is displayed, then this appliance supports autogrowing of partitions.

If the message “Autogrow is enabled” is not displayed then use the following procedure to determine the appropriate expansion method for growing the root partition on your File Fabric.

Determining Appropriate Expansion Method

In the instructions that follow, some partition names have the letter ‘s’ immediately following the second slash, for example:

/dev/sda1

In other cases the partition name has the letter ‘v’ immediately following the second slash, for example:

/dev/vda1

For the purpose of following these instructions the distinction does not matter.

The ‘a’ preceding the number at the end of the partition name is, however, significant. It indicates the device (disk) on which the device resides, These instructions are only concerned with partitions on the device identified by the letter ‘a’. If your File Fabric has more than one device then you may see partition names with other letters besides ‘a’. For the purposes of this document they should be ignored.

Log into the Enterprise File Fabric as smeconfiguser and then become root by running:

su -

Next run fdisk to list the drives and partitions on the appliance:

fdisk -l

One of three layouts will be present in the results.

Logical Volume Manager (LVM) Partition

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *        2048     1050623      524288   83  Linux
/dev/sda2         1050624    72359935    35654656   8e  Linux LVM

If the second partition is of Id type 8e, “Linux LVM”, then the appliance is using LVM and the LVM-partition-expansion directions should be followed.

Swap Partition at End

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/vda1   *        2048     1050623      524288   83  Linux
/dev/vda2         1050624    55576575    27262976   83  Linux
/dev/vda3        55576576    72353791     8388608   82  Linux swap / Solaris

If three partitions are present for the device and the last one is of type 82 “Linux swap / Solaris”, then follow the swap-partition-at-end directions.

Swap Partition Before Root

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/vda1   *        2048     1050623      524288   83  Linux
/dev/vda2         1050624    17827839     8388608   82  Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/vda3        17827840    75497471    28834816   83  Linux

If three partitions are present and the second one is of type 82 “Linux swap / Solaris”, then follow the swap-partition-before-root directions.